Early voting is all the rage - Must Read Alaska
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Tuesday, June 15, 2021
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Early voting is all the rage

A tsunami of voting is occurring in Alaska. But does it mean a high turnout or simply a change in voting patterns as a result of the coronavirus pandemic?

Analysis of one Anchorage district shows that only five percent of the Democrat early voters are new voters, and over 50 percent of the Democrat early voters vote in nearly every election. Over 95 percent of them share an address with someone who votes in nearly single election (a super voter).

Alaskans have requested 138,209 absentee ballots from the Division of Elections, with just two days to go before the deadline passes to request an absentee ballot.

So far, Alaska voters have voted over 64,385 ballots. That includes 11,267 in-person ballots cast since early voting began on Monday, and 49,713 ballots voted and sent in by mail.

The turnout so far compares to 102,284 total absentee, early, and online ballots issued in the 2018 election, and a total of 97,571 of them voted.

As of Thursday morning’s count, that means 66 percent of all the early ballots cast in 2018 have already been cast this year, with 12 days until the election is over.

As usual, House District 28 is voting the most, with 2,411 absentee ballots cast so far — the highest in the state. House District 40, however, only saw 165 voting absentee or early, so far.

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Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comment

  • I am a traditionalist voter. I vote on Election day, and in person. Never early, never absentee.

    Frankly, I do not trust the USPS enough to send cash, why would I trust them to safely and accurately deliver a ballot?
    As to the early voting. Why? What benefit does it provide for the masses? Sure, it allows you to get it out of the way at your convenience, instead of waiting for the first Tuesday of November. But, this “wave” of early voters only lead me to believe that they were waiting with baited breath for early voting to start.
    What’s the difference? Today or Nov. 3?

    I know, I am just an old fuddy-duddy, but hey, it is my opinion. (Start the flood of replies about how COVID is making it too dangerous to have crowds on election day. Thanks, but moving the day the crowd shows up to two weeks earlier does not make October 20 safe.)

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