COVID-19 update: 7 new cases, first one in Kodiak - Must Read Alaska
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Friday, May 14, 2021
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COVID-19 update: 7 new cases, first one in Kodiak

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Seven Alaskans have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the last state report midday Tuesday.

A total of 300 cases have been identified in Alaska, with 110 of those cases known to be recovered, for a total of 190 active cases. 

A total of nine Alaskans have died from the illness, including two who died out of state. No deaths have been reported in the last 48 hours. It has been 20 days since the first COVID-19 death occurred in Alaska.

There has been one more hospitalization in the past 24 hours, bringing that total to 35. However, most of those people are not currently hospitalized; nine have died and others have been released to recover at home.

The death rate in Alaska is currently 3 per 100 cases of the Wuhan coronavirus that is believed to have started in Wuhan, China late last year.

Alaska communities that added cases in the past 24 hours were: Anchorage (4), Juneau 2), and there is the first case diagnosed in the Kodiak area (1).

Total cases that have been diagnosed in Alaska, (including recovered and deaths):

  • Anchorage: 143
  • Kenai Peninsula: 16
  • Fairbanks/North Star Borough: 79
  • Southeast Fairbanks Census Area: 1
  • Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area: 1
  • Kodiak: 1
  • Mat-Su Borough: 15
  • Nome Area 1
  • Juneau: 23
  • Ketchikan: 15
  • Petersburg: 2
  • Craig: 2
  • Bethel: 1
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Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comments

  • Well, it’s slowly making it’s way out of the burbs. Slowly but surely.

  • How many tested? How many negative?

    • https://coronavirus-response-alaska-dhss.hub.arcgis.com

      From our first case to our first 100 cases it took 12 days. The second 100 took 10 days,

      …the third 100 took 17 days.

      From such a small sample it may look like social distancing helped slow the spread.

      Relaxing the mandates too soon will likely accelerate the spread once more.

      We all want to return to normal.  We all want to work and grow our businesses and sustain our families and our communities.

      But the cost of ignoring public health directives or lifting them too soon isn’t like throwing a boomerang, (ie the virus only returning to those who throw it), a second wave of returning virus impacts our health care workers, first responders, essential workers and the vulnerable disproportionately. A second wave all force even stricter controls and will impact the economy even more than now.

      That is the heartbreaking fact that has played across the world, in city after city and country after country throughout the history of global pandemics..

      • If the original IHME model used by the USA to gauge the response to Covid19 had been more accurate the response to this pandemic would have been much less Draconian. Just to mention a few of the wildly exaggerated claims from this model, and Dr Fauci, they were predicting 250,000 deaths in the USA, 40,000 ventilators needed by NYC, Seattle running out of hospital beds, etc. These predictions were inaccurate by up to 10 times less. And before the armchair epidemiologists say that social distancing is responsible for the lower numbers, be aware that the IHME models factored in social distancing, quarintines, etc. The model was still wildly inaccurate.

      • Well said. I hope most of Alaska will be able to stay hunkered down for a few more weeks.

  • All this economic destruction, and all because of a phoney model used to pump fear, fear and more fear 24/7. All it took for the US to become China is a chinese virus. Enjoy your future poverty America, remember who did this to you.

  • 300 cases in a state with 734,000 people, let’s see, that makes it about .04% of the population. Deaths are .001%, that’s like a bad day on the Glenn.
    What am I missing here? Not enough testing? Over reaction by the government? Inaccurate numbers of those infected? Panic? Fiction? Insanity? ARRRGH…!

  • Your figures are wrong. The deaths that you have, are counted to a population of almost 800,000 people. The cases are 300 in a population of 800,000. That is extremely small in numbers as compared to other states. For as much driving back and forth to the valley from and too Anchorage, the numbers are very small in the valley and for the 200,000 people here, the cases numbers are very, very small. The deaths are statistically very small. It should make a person wonder about the contact to contract the disease issue. We are not getting the correct numbers and that is bad. Consider that 800,000 population and three hundred cases should not put the economy down here in Alaska at all. This economy needs to open now. The numbers may be put out there to frighten people and to use the federal monies unnecessarily to make it look like a pandemic in Alaska when that is not the case. We have a mayor in Anchorage that uses false pretenses to get his agenda done but we are talking about the whole state of Alaska being shut down on pretense and not really at the standard of care that a pandemic is apprised for. The Governor needs to reassess as far as I can see. We need to get the state moving. Flu is Flu and colds are colds. Cancer is cancer and heart attacks are heart attacks are the same in health issues that can kill. All of these are serious but life in activity should not stop.

  • Oh look a whole 0.04% of the population has it! Let’s shut down the economy and force everyone into their rabbit holes to hide in fear.

    • You can’t have it both ways. Low numbers and complain about lock down, vs high numbers and freedom. Which is it?

  • If we don’t get our engines started back up pretty pronto, there won’t be much left when that second wave of the pandemic hits this 2020 fall/winter. Alaskans are darn tough but to stretch their seasonal income when there is no income, is far fetched. Americans are in the process of being turned totally dependent on the gov’t. No work, free money, watch those dastardly bosses and owners at the companies “get theirs”. The gov’t says it has our back/front/sides from now on. How many sane citizens expect this to work out in America’s best interest? Just what source is all the “free” money coming from. Can’t they see? The only source is from the people. The way it will end for the dollar is with an imitation of Zimbabwe or Venezuela and their “economies”. The “common” people that pay taxes, have jobs, own homes, cars and whose share of the American dream appears to be fleeting are the ones under fire. Ordinarily, some would say “get another or better job”. Now it’s going to be ‘take any job’ or face a life on the dole with all it’s gov’t attachments. The dole appeals to some. Hopefully not most. Freedom is not free. Yes, Wuhan v is serious and deadly to many. Destruction of our country, state and local economies is potentially serious and deadly to every citizen. Americans deserve a decent chance. We’re not getting it yet. Too many “experts” with a ‘finger in the pie’ and conflicting messages. Keep ’em confused and baffle ’em with BS. Old trick.

    • Ok, let’s open it back up and get everyone sick. That will make the pfd go up.

      • Greg,
        I’ll bet you think Fauci and Birx are the sole authority on Wuhan v. Their “advice” to President Trump is what got us into this “believe or not believe” conundrum. Their advice and explanations to Americans seem to change about as often as the tide. Believe them if you want. I don’t. I watched Fauci espouse his opinions last night on tv. Same old, same old. Little different exclamation points but the same message. BS. Vaccine, vaccine, vaccine. That’s his message (BTW. Fauci sits on the board of directors of the Gates foundation. I hope you know what that means). He ignores/forgets that vaccines won’t work unless perfectly matched to the specific mutation of the Wuhan v. Never happen. Over 40 mutations have been identified. That would mean over 40 different vaccines would be required with mutations only to the date of mutation discovery. The virus is constantly mutating. By the time a vaccine is available, it most likely won’t work. Might as well save what’s left of our economy. The Wuhan v will have the same outcome either way.

        • The ability to create recombinant viral vector vaccines is a core function of Gilbert’s research group at the Jenner Institute, which over the past few years has progressed work on many vaccines, including those for influenza and Zika virus and early stage trials for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus vaccine, a helpful template for the work on a COVID-19 vaccine.

          https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30796-0/fulltext

          • Bill,
            “Viral vector vaccines” are what the flu shots are. Notice, most of the flu vaccines don’t work on the current flu mutation. Never have, yet we keep getting harangued to get a new one every year. From what I’ve read, a traditional vaccine derived from a weakened virus, will not work on multiple mutations, which is what Wuhan v is. The vaccine has to specifically match the current version of the virus. With over 40 mutations identified, the odds of picking the right one are infinite. I’m no scientist but seeing as the only thing in common with all the mutations is supposedly the base DNA/RNA, it would seem the “vaccine” must need to work from that angle, if that’s possible.
            Idle time aplenty for me right now.

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