Shopping season: Homer City Council shops for new judge in election-residency case - Must Read Alaska
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Saturday, December 7, 2019
HomePoliticsShopping season: Homer City Council shops for new judge in election-residency case

Shopping season: Homer City Council shops for new judge in election-residency case

The City Council of Homer is preparing to legally defend its decision to seat a council member about whom questions were raised concerning her legitimacy as a candidate.

But the first order of business for Homer? Get a different judge.

Superior Court Judge Andrew Guidi had been assigned to the election-related case, the first hearing of which was scheduled for Dec. 3 in Anchorage. But in a motion filed last week, the defendants — Homer City Council — asked for some other judge. That was assigned today: Judge Josie Garton.

Guidi is a judge who constitutionalists prefer, as he is less of an activist than some others on the Anchorage Superior Court. Garton has served on the court for 18 months, having been appointed by Gov. Bill Walker.

The lawsuit was filed by a former council member, Tom Stroozas, who discovered that Storm Hansen-Cavasos had not been living inside the municipal boundaries for the 12 months prior to the election, therefore the council swearing her in was a violation of the city code.

Homer’s attorneys, Michael Gatti and Mary Pinkel, have also asked that the court extend the time they have to file a response to Stroozas’ request for a temporary restraining order and/or preliminary injunction.

Update: The court has since changed the date of the hearing to Dec. 5.

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Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comments

  • Yes, of course because it’s a judge who Walker appointed.

  • The writing’s on the wall for the citizens of Homer. If the leftists win this ridiculous contest to ignore city code and install a non-resident of the city on the city council, conservatives and those not with the leftists can kiss their traditional Alaskan town goodbye. This “Storm” person must be the swing vote on the council. Of course, get a judge that sides with your issue. That’s the leftist way. If you can’t buy one, maybe you can ‘rent’ one or “organize” protests when you fail at replacing a true judge with a leftist. Sorry to see Homer go down this road. I’ll bet all the conservatives there are sorry. I wonder how many voted. That’s the key.

    • Sadly you are so right. A 25 year resident I have seen it coming and at an accelerated rate in the last 5 years.
      Much of the blame is Republicans who don’t bother to vote when it is important. Like every election

  • “The lawsuit was filed by a former council member, Tom Stroozas, who discovered that Storm Hansen-Cavasos had not been living inside the municipal boundaries for the 12 months prior to the election, therefore the council swearing her in was a violation of the city code.”

    As this process was coming down, I heard of it on the radio. I’d say the following would be responsible reporting:

    The lawsuit was filed by a former council member, Tom Stroozas, who CLAIMED that Storm Hansen-Cavasos had not been living inside the municipal boundaries for the 12 months prior to the election, AND THAT therefore the council swearing her in was a violation of the city code.

    Which rendition is correct is actually up to the judicial process to determine. It certainly is not the responsibility of the press.

  • . Many cases are won or lost when the judge is assigned the case. People who think all judges are neutral and always make unbiased decisions are often very mistaken. Judges are very aware of the political implications of their decisions. And remember that they are up for election every few years.
    Watch how a judge performs when a high profile case is televised. Then watch when it is not televised. Big difference. And God help a defendant in a high profile criminal case if he has to appear before a Judge who is up for election around the same time. Did not happen with Judge Corey, true. And he may have ruled correctly or not. But he was just plain stupid to decide the matter before his election.
    Politics are rampant in every judicial system in the country. Alaska included.

    • Judges are certainly not elected here, and they’re up for a retention vote every 10 years. Sounds like Zac Brown got kinda screwed too down there.

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