Alaska coronavirus cases: 69 - Must Read Alaska
Connect with:
Tuesday, April 7, 2020
HomePoliticsAlaska coronavirus cases: 69

Alaska coronavirus cases: 69

Alaska has identified 10 more cases of coronavirus among Alaskans, bringing the state total to 69 that are known to health professionals.

The numbers have grown along with testing throughout the state, but the number of actual cases is likely higher, because test results take a few days.

Of the 10 new cases, two are travel related, four are not travel related, and four are close contact with another person who has the virus, according to the Department of Health and Social Services.

On Tuesday, the State reported a jump of 17 new cases, the largest number in a single day that have been reported. At this time, most of the cases are in Anchorage:

  • Anchorage: 33
  • Fairbanks/North Pole: 15
  • Mat/Su: 2
  • Ketchikan: 11
  • Juneau: 3
  • Kenai Peninsula communities: 5

To compare, Hawaii has 106 cases of the Wuhan coronavirus, and British Columbia has 659 cases, while the Yukon Territory has just 3 cases. This story will be updated.

Donations Welcome

Share

Written by

Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comments

  • It’s really worth keeping an eye on Hawaii, they have roughly twice our resident population and being isolated from the lower 48 we have similar situations. Their 14 day quarantine for out of state travelers was enacted a little sooner than ours, but ours has much stronger punishment for violation. Our economies differ quite a bit, but tourism is a big part of both states economy…theirs more than ours.

  • Good reporting, Suzanne.

    • How many are health care workers and if health care workers continue to contract the virus, what does this tell us about PPE and the hospital environment in general?

      • Probably not as much as it does the communicability of the virus.

      • Steve,
        Lots of “what if’s”. No matter what happens beyond our control, we must deal with it. We need to be focused now on what we are going to do when this reaches our community/neighborhood and how we are going to do it–together. This isn’t “everyone for themselves”. This is all of us against a common enemy. It is and will be, more difficult to win if politics and personal ill will are part and parcel to the diseases confronting us (financial, physical, emotional, etc.) that are being brought to us by an entity that doesn’t have our best interest in mind. Not conspiracy theory, just opinion.

  • Has Dunleavy released a plan for how he is going to get ventilators, build out emergency care facilities, expand testing and obtain personal protection equipment for our healthcare worker who are getting infected because we don’t have the needed materials and facilities?
    I hear he’s still making promises about PFDs but no word on a rolling out a comprehensive healthcare plan.

    • http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Epi/id/Pages/COVID-19/default.aspx
      .
      There have been press releases almost daily, almost all your questions are answered in the link above. Lots of other valuable information as well.
      .
      Might be a good time to put politics aside and pay attention.

    • I’ll watch for your reply and compliments to the gov if he’s able to get ventilators, AND get back the money the legislators and special interest stole from us. To deny the importance of the latter is to deny reality due to partisan and philosophical bias.. the reality is getting back those funds for Alaskan families will be huge in preventing a total collapse of the economy, and all the ill that will come of that. I’m sure you’ll be the first one on here with words of praise if he tackles both issues. I’m certain your concerns aren’t motivated by blind political bias and partisanship.

      • Exactly none of the questions I asked are answered on the link you offered.

        There is a wealth of information about what other people might do but nothing in that link addresses the questions I asked.

        I’ll repeat, there’s been no actual information on how Dunleavy is going to get ventilators, build out emergency care facilities, expand testing or obtain personal protection equipment for our healthcare workers.

        If you can cite and quote any answers to those questions, I’m sure all Alaska would be interested in what you find.

        • Bill,

          On the link I provided there is a tab titled Media & Communications, you can click here http://dhss.alaska.gov/dph/Epi/id/Pages/COVID-19/communications.aspx if you want, all of your questions have been answered and there is a ton of information from the governor, if you do not want to find the answers or you just want to remain ignorant that’s on you.

  • 70 cases in Alaska now…how come we only see the cases but they don’t (or won’t) talk about those that have recovered?

    • They can’t even test people who are showing symptoms, let alone the people who are positive and not showing symptoms, how would they be expected to test to see if anyone has recovered?

  • We can get back to somewhat normal if the 14 day quarantine is followed and enforced. If this was done earlier we would not have to be locked down and workers could still be working. Our governor should have closed the way into the state a month ago or more. We can control the virus by stopping it at our border fairly easy. We are too late now. Hang on for more cases to come.

  • If as they say we have tested one third of one percent of our population. 2388 out of a population of approximately 750,000, and 69 are positive, that means 2.8 percent of those tested were positive.
    2.8 percent of 750,000 is more than we have the capacity to care for, and if those 2.8 percent infect the lower end estimate of 2.5 others, we are not going to be getting back to ‘normal’ for months.
    Each of those newly infected people starts a new 14 day clock all over again.

  • Ben,
    My question was pretty straightforward.
    Nothing political about it.
    If this flu like virus is spreading rapidly in the medical community like we see in NYC then society should really consider how hospitals and nursing homes are the real incubators of many diseases like MERS and sepsis.
    Do you not remember it started in Seattle in 10 nursing homes?
    How did it get in there?
    Who was the real patient #1?
    As for people like you who are quick to beat the war drum for fighting a type of flu like virus, I would say maybe you can research just how many Americans died this winter from the normal flu because it is a considerable amount more than will perish from Coronavirus.
    All things in perspective…do not just respond to unscientific media hype.

    • Steve,
      First and foremost, the Chinese virus is not like the flu. It’s many multiples worse. Icelandic scientists have confirmed 40+ mutations of the virus. Some worse, some not. The nursing homes in Seattle are not where it started. That’s where it was unleashed. It started in Wuhan, China. By mistake? On purpose? Lots of food for thought there. I’m not beating any drum or anything else except this sickness. I probably do more research than most anyone on this site, including you. The nursing homes in Seattle rely on Canadian Chinese workers who cross the border regularly for most of their personnel. They blame them. Actually, many people say mostly the same thing as you. Discount and discredit actual truth. Everyone’s turn will come at the “whipping post” sooner or later. I don’t think valid news should be discounted as fake at this juncture. The research is there for the looking.

  • The numbers you made up in no way reflect anything close to the reality of the situation we are in.
    .
    Here is an article that helps explain the numbers we should be looking at. https://ourworldindata.org/covid-mortality-risk
    .
    The numbers are constantly changing at this point, but at this point it looks like most that are infected aren’t showing any signs or the symptoms are mild only a small percentage of those infected require hospitalization and an even smaller number die from this disease.

  • Not sure who you’re referring to when you say the numbers are made up, but the numbers I got are provided by the State of Alaska.

    I didn’t mention anything about mortality rates so I’m unclear why you’d respond with a link to information unrelated to what the State of Alaska announced.

  • The New England Journal of Medicine has a report on the first case recorded in the US.

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2001191

leave a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: