Downer: Anchorage gets downgraded bond ratings after years of big-spending Berkowitz - Must Read Alaska
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Wednesday, December 8, 2021
HomePoliticsDowner: Anchorage gets downgraded bond ratings after years of big-spending Berkowitz

Downer: Anchorage gets downgraded bond ratings after years of big-spending Berkowitz

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Standard and Poor’s Global Ratings downgraded the Anchorage Municipality general obligation and certificate of participation bonds from a “AAA” rating to a “AA+” rating. 

S&P also lowered its outlook on all general obligation bond ratings for the Municipality of Anchorage from “stable” to “negative”.

The downgrades reflect a material decline in the municipality’s available reserves, which is expected to worsen in Fiscal Year 2021. S&P Global Ratings stated that “If the municipality is unable to restore reserves to their fund balance targets in 2022 and 2023, we could lower the rating.”

If the municipality is unable to restore reserves to their fund balance targets in 2022 and 2023, we could lower the rating.

S&P Global Ratings

S&P Global Ratings view of the municipality’s general creditworthiness is due to appropriation risk.

“Capital expenditures from the 2018 earthquake, revenue declines from COVID-19, and the cost and labor shortages associated with construction in Alaska, and delayed Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reimbursements have forced the municipality to draw down its reserves. Officials hope to increase fund balances in 2022 and 2023, but they face numerous challenges to restore reserves,” S&P Global Ratings said.

Fitch Ratings of a ‘AA+’ rating to the Municipality of Anchorage’s general obligation bonds came with a warning based on expenditures that have been incurred beyond the federal assistance during the pandemic. 

These additional costs resulted in a negative $40 million year end 2020 fund balance for the Municipality as a whole.

“Additional upfront costs to address the disasters were incurred in fiscal year 2021, which will diminish the municipality’s financial cushion and heighten fiscal risk. Fitch expects the municipality to take all necessary steps for FEMA reimbursements, but delays or inability to be reimbursed could prolong a diminished financial cushion and could result in negative pressure on the rating,” Fitch stated.

A downgrade in the rating of the Municipality’s General Obligation Bonds would trigger a material increase in interest expense costs associated with borrowing in the Capital Marketplace.

This could make it more expensive for the Municipality of Anchorage to borrow in the future with the increased costs directly impacting taxpayers.

From 2016 to 2020, government spending has increased in the MOA by approximately 20%.

The MOA Unassigned Fund Balance went from a surplus of $11.2 in 2016 to a deficit of $40 million in 2020, all attributed to the Berkowitz Administration and leftist Assembly.

During the same period the Municipality of Anchorage’s population has decreased from 299,330 to 285,400 residents.

“I believe that government should begin right-sizing unsustainable spending to reflect the decreases in population that have occurred in the MOA over the past several years,” Mayor Dave Bronson said.  “Now is the time to act, to eliminate the level of uncertainty Anchorage residents and taxpayers have felt for years. That’s why this proposed budget is a call to action for us. I will continue to seek a decrease in government spending and seek to take the burden off the tax cap for all people of Anchorage.  We don’t want our children and grandchildren to have to pay the debts incurred today.”

S&P Global Ratings report stated that the Municipality of Anchorage can return to a stable scenario if it restores reserves through a combination of FEMA reimbursements or reducing expenditures, and they could revise the outlook to stable.

The Fitch Ratings report states that budget management in times of economic recovery historically has been strong, with prompt rebuilding of the municipality’s reserve safety margin. And that sound budgeting practices include things like “frequent course corrections to restore long-term structural budget balance.”

When former Mayor Dan Sullivan retired after six years, he left substantial fund balances, which were drained under the six years of Ethan Berkowitz and acting mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson.

The bad news for Anchorage comes just hours before the Assembly is set to meet to add back over $4.2 million to Mayor Bronson’s trimmed back budget for the coming fiscal year.

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Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comments

  • Berky, where are you, you big chicken S? Come out, come out, wherever you are!

  • Berkowitz, despite his other flaws, did not case the earthquake or Covid. Let’s hope that we can cut spending to match the new, lower, population and maybe even stop making Anchorage the kind of place that people want to move away from.

  • Anyone who buys a bond is an idiot. Buy gold you will be better off.

  • Sounds like a perfect time to start spending on pet projects…

  • Well, duh.
    Did you expect anything else?

  • The fact:
    “From 2016 to 2020, government spending has increased in the MOA by approximately 20%. The MOA Unassigned Fund Balance went from a surplus of $11.2 in 2016 to a deficit of $40 million in 2020”

    The SD allegation:
    “all attributed to the Berkowitz Administration and leftist Assembly.”

    But…

    ‘ “Capital expenditures from the 2018 earthquake, revenue declines from COVID-19, and the cost and labor shortages associated with construction in Alaska, and delayed Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reimbursements have forced the municipality to draw down its reserves. Officials hope to increase fund balances in 2022 and 2023, but they face numerous challenges to restore reserves,” S&P Global Ratings said.’…. which is the cited source?

    So … strange article SD

    • Maybe the S and P?

  • Eaglexit!!!!!!

  • One rating agency holds Anchorage at it’s previous rating, but the other one… with which the Bronson administration just met….. lowers theirs. With no change whatsoever in the underlying fundamentals. So the only variable is the Bronson administration’s statements to S&P. Doesn’t take a detective to figure out what happened here.

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