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Saturday, November 17, 2018
HomePolitics and PolicyWalker’s former Attorney General says he’s for Dunleavy

Walker’s former Attorney General says he’s for Dunleavy

BREAKS WITH HIS FORMER BOSS

In an opinion printed by the Juneau Empire today, Gov. Bill Walker’s former law partner, his former attorney general, and current chairman of the Permanent Fund is supporting Mike Dunleavy for governor.

Craig Richards is going a different way than Gov. Bill Walker, who has endorsed and voted for Mark Begich (although also saying he doesn’t officially endorse him).

Hawkins

Richards is more direct. He’s with Mike Dunleavy.

“My personal experience serving in state government has convinced me that cutting first is the right approach, which is why I am supporting Dunleavy. But regardless of who wins, it is important that the next governor be viewed as having a mandate for their approach and that we act rapidly,” Richards wrote.

Begich and Dunleavy have different philosophies on how to tackle Alaska’s structural budget deficit, Richards wrote.

“Begich would draw 4 percent of the market value of the Permanent Fund and dedicate half to dividends and half to education, as well as transfer $14 billion from the Earning Reserve to the principle of the Fund. He also proposes bonding for $3-5 billion for a large capital budget over the next six years and to pay off the loan using a portion of the existing yearly capital budget. Loan payments will be over $200 million for twenty years if we borrow $3 billion, and the divertible capital budget is no more than $100 million, adding about $100 million to the deficit annually. However, his plan has lower dividends and produces approximately $300 million more from the Permanent Fund draw spent on government. Other than those two items, Begich’s fiscal plan is largely focused on the structure of accounts and fund flows and does not have substantial impact on the deficit.”

That is the long way of explaining that Begich’s plan would cost Alaska and produce lower dividends, but not close the deficit.

“Begich does not want major cuts. He states that if other elements of his fiscal plan are passed, he would adopt additional revenue measures as needed so long as they do not fall disproportionately on the needy. Thus taxation is a primary tool he will use to address the deficit,”

“Dunleavy is pursuing a different approach. Rather than immediately reducing the dividend and adopting taxes, Dunleavy indicates his plan is designed to rebuild the people’s trust. He intends to do that by reducing the operating budget through spending cuts. He has not identified all the cuts he will make or the total magnitude, instead committing to delve deeply into the effort once in office. Dunleavy is also a proponent of adopting a spending cap to prevent the budget from growing too fast in the future. He also believes in seeking the people’s input through a constitutional amendment or advisory vote to let Alaskans decide how to treat the dividend. If these things happen, then voters will be more open to a discussion around other fiscal options like how to use the Permanent Fund. Finally, Dunleavy is optimistic and determined to spur the development of Alaska’s resources to generate new state revenues.”

Richards says both approaches have their weaknesses.

“So where does this leave Alaska? Both plans leave a structural deficit of about $1 billion at $70 per-barrel oil that gets reduced and approaches a balanced budget north of $80 per barrel. Begich intends to address the deficit by focusing on taxes, and Dunleavy by focusing on cuts in the short term and growing Alaska’s resource economy in the long term. Neither has identified many of the details around their proposals, but the deficit is a bit of a moving target, and specifics will develop once the new governor takes office.

“However, the governor and Legislature must be prepared to act rapidly. Since oil prices fell in 2014, the structural deficit has been funded by savings. Although the Permanent Fund is now being used to contribute to government, cuts have been modest, and no tax package has been adopted. Consequently, state savings have fallen from over $10 billion when Gov. Bill Walker took office, to just over $2 billion when he will leave. That means at $70 per-barrel oil, we can only fund the deficit for about two years.

“Unless we get lucky with high oil prices, we have no option but to act. What I like about this election is the clear choice voters have about what that action looks like. Do we cut or tax?”

It appears that Richards believes more cuts are needed in State spending, and that he’ll take his chances with Gov. Dunleavy.

 

 

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Suzanne Downing had careers in business and journalism before serving as the Director of Faith and Community-based Initiatives for Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and returning to Alaska to serve as speechwriter for Gov. Sean Parnell. Born on the Oregon coast, she moved to Alaska in 1969.

Latest comments

  • Alaska’s state workforce of 22,000 plus is simply not sustainable. Shame on Gov. Walker for wasting $8 Billion on excess staff. This study by the Alaska Policy Center shows that Alaska’s state workforce is more than twice the national average, and by “right-sizing” the staffing we could save $1.7 Billion annually.

    http://alaskapolicyforum.org/2018/10/right-sizing-alaskas-state-government-workforce-part-ii/

    Gov. Dunleavy should immediately begin these cuts, at least 3000 – 6000 less the first year, and the state workforce should be down to the national average per capita within 2 years. Anything less will not be acceptable. Electing Begich will wipe out our savings within those same 2 years.

  • Oh, right! He’s now a Dunleavy supporter. Can’t be because he wants to stay on the PF Board of Trustees as its chairman. No of course not. He just wants the best person to be governor. Right. Pretty sure that Dunleavy will see through this masquerade.

  • An important endorsement and a very clear, well written article. Suzanne, your coverage of this race has been first rate. For that I thank you.

    • Suzanne is the very best writer in Alaska. By a long shot. And courageous!

      • Suzanne Downing would make a GREAT speech writer for Governor Dunleavy. But to keep her at Must Read Alaska, we better thank her with generous donations.

        • What an awesome idea. I will write Governor Dunleavy a letter and suggest Suzanne to be the Governor’s speech writer. Everyone: please donate and keep Suzanne pulling for OUR cause. She is simply……..THE BEST.

  • No doubt, Richard’s has seen the latest polls which favor Dunleavy. I wonder if Mallott will endorse Dunleavy too?

  • Funny, I saw Craig Richard’s holding up a 4×8 Dunleavy sign at the corner of Spenard and old Minnesota. He had a smaller sign too that read,
    “Homeless. Anything will help. Godbless.”

  • The former AG has written a thoughtful and insightful analysis.

    Thanks for that.

    • But, do you actually believe him, Dan?
      Do you really believe he has no other motive for going public at this time other than just wanting the best governor. Come on Dan. You know better.

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